Raspberry Pi

The original model

The Raspberry Pi is a series of small single-board computers developed in the United Kingdom by the Raspberry Pi Foundation to promote the teaching of basic computer science in schools and in developing countries


The Raspberry Pi Foundation started a teacher training course called Picademy with the aim of helping teachers prepare for teaching the new computing curriculum using the Raspberry Pi in the classroom.[176] The continued professional development course is provided free for teachers and is run by the Foundation's education team.


In January 2017, a free MOOC course launched on Kadenze in collaboration with University of New South Wales in Sydney Australia on the Internet of Things using Raspberry Pi Online Rpi Course. There are also good online resources for Raspberry Pi on Sparkfun site as well as the Raspberry Pi Organization community.


2015, best-selling British computer

2015, best-selling British computer

By November 2016 they had sold 11 million units, and 12.5m by March 2017, making it the third best-selling "general purpose computer".In July 2017, sales reached nearly 15 million.

Overview

The Raspberry Pi Zero, a US$5 model first introduced in 2015

Several generations of Raspberry Pis have been released. All models feature a Broadcom system on a chip (SoC) with an integrated ARM compatible central processing unit (CPU) and on-chip graphics processing unit (GPU)

The Foundation provides Raspbian, a Debian-based Linux distribution for download, as well as third-party Ubuntu, Windows 10 IoT Core, RISC OS, and specialised media center distributions.

Hardware

The Raspberry Pi hardware has evolved through several versions that feature variations in memory capacity and peripheral-device support.

Processor

The Raspberry Pi 2 uses a 32-bit 900 MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor.

The Broadcom BCM2835 SoC used in the first generation Raspberry Pi is somewhat equivalent to the chip used in first modern generation smartphones[clarification needed] (its CPU is an older ARMv6 architecture),[22] which includes a 700 MHz ARM1176JZF-S processor, VideoCore IV graphics processing unit (GPU),[23] and RAM. It has a level 1 (L1) cache of 16 KB and a level 2 (L2) cache of 128 KB. The level 2 cache is used primarily by the GPU. The SoC is stacked underneath the RAM chip, so only its edge is visible.


The earlier models of Raspberry Pi 2 use a Broadcom BCM2836 SoC with a 900 MHz 32-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor, with 256 KB shared L2 cache.[24] The Raspberry Pi 2 V1.2 was upgraded to a Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with a 1.2 GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 processor,[25] the same SoC which is used on the Raspberry Pi 3.


The Raspberry Pi 3 uses a Broadcom BCM2837 SoC with a 1.2 GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 processor, with 512 KB shared L2 cache

Jan. 17, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE)

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Network communication

The Model A, A+ and Pi Zero have no Ethernet circuitry and are commonly connected to a network using an external user-supplied USB Ethernet or Wi-Fi adapter. On the Model B and B+ the Ethernet port is provided by a built-in USB Ethernet adapter using the SMSC LAN9514 chip.[41] The Raspberry Pi 3 and Pi Zero W (wireless) are equipped with 2.4 GHz WiFi 802.11n (150 Mbit/s) and Bluetooth 4.1 (24 Mbit/s) based on Broadcom BCM43438 FullMAC chip with no official support for Monitor mode but implemented through unofficial firmware patching[42] and the Pi 3 also has a 10/100 Ethernet port.